21.10 2016

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At some stage of our lives, we will either be on the receiving end of a brief, or giving one. Creative briefs are special little beasts of their own – mainly because when dealing with a creative, one sometimes takes that word literally, or sometimes one is unsure exactly of all the detail necessary to effectively communicate what it is that you’re needing.

To give you some examples, here are some things that can possibly go wrong when instructions are a little vague.

Briefing disasters

 

Perhaps it’s good to check how your logo will behave on a new item before you sign off production.

Perhaps it’s good to check how your logo will behave on a new item before you sign off production.

Always good to brief the designer of the direction that the item must face.

Always good to brief the designer of the direction that the item must face.

Be as specific as possible. With briefs, instructions will always be taken literally.

Be as specific as possible. With briefs, instructions will always be taken literally.

When it comes to effective briefing, visual references and written instructions are always appreciated. While doing some research, we did have a good giggle at some of the instructions that drive creatives mad…

What not to say in your brief

You’re creative, you figure it out.

I’m not sure. Try something else.

Try a more powerful colour.

It’s not wow enough.

 Make it pop.

 

So, how do you get the most of the briefing process?

Have a budget in mind

Know your budget for the project, or per product. With the cost of raw materials, plus the time needed to execute, having an idea of the price-point you are looking for really helps when putting something together. Be as specific you can with the budget. If you give too large a range, this can cause an overheating of heads trying to work out if you want cheap or high-end, detailed or simple, etc.

Use references but not rip offs

With the information you are giving on your brief, visual references / CAD drawings / colour-swatches / googled images, etc are received with open arms. Be careful to keep your references original – don’t make one creative copy another creatives’ work (that’s a no-no in the underworld of original work and respect for artistry), rather give some strong guidance and direction in terms of what you want – and of course an idea of size will also help prevent any surprises later!

 Clear OCD instructions

 What can I say here? The more detail, the better. If something needs to be 17.31cm exactly with 3 and a half rows of red beads, then rather write a thesis of instructions than end up with something that is slightly out of what you wanted. Most of the time, you, the person tasked with briefing the creative have in turn probably been briefed by someone else (a client or a boss), and we want you to be the hero by wowing them with what you have sourced – so be detailed with your instructions, we certainly love that very much!

 

 

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